Connect with us

Lifestyle

Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory

The Geländewagen, particularly the monstrous version from Affalterbach, is the dream ride for almost everyone; from hardcore ‘Petrolheads’ such as myself, to contemporary fashionistas who only pose for pictures on Instagram.

Published

on

Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory Asante Afrika
Mercedes Benz AMG G63

Car Torque with “The Real KennyMas”

Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory Asante Afrika
Black Mercedes Benz AMG G63

When you think of the word ‘legendary’, what comes to mind? If you are in this part of the world you are likely to think up the name Madiba. The name commands such a presence, you literally get chills when you remember the man to whom the name belongs, even though the man left the land of the living almost seven years ago. The word ‘legendary’ can also be used to describe a certain mechanical masterpiece in the same breath. The mechanical masterpiece in question evokes uhmm, at least to me, the same emotions that the memories of President Rholihlahla Mandela evoke in many people all over the world. The Mercedes Benz G Class casts an unmistakable shadow on the automotive world that you would have to be Stevie Wonder to miss it. The Geländewagen, particularly the monstrous version from Affalterbach, is the dream ride for almost everyone; from hardcore ‘Petrolheads’ such as myself, to contemporary fashionistas who only pose for pictures on Instagram.

The G Class Mercedes did not start out its life as the posh luxury vehicle that we all know and love today. Like Comrade Mandela, the Geländewagen was forged by the scourge of war. The vehicle started out as a military vehicle manufactured by Magna Steyr under license from Mercedes Benz in 1972. Much like the luminary Madiba’s transition into life after war, the civilian G class only emerged seven years later in 1979, to arise as one of the world’s most desirable luxury boxes, just as capable on the city streets as it is in the jungle with its unmistakable boxy look designed for military efficiency. The car is so majestic that even former Popes have used it in the past.

“The vehicle started out as a military vehicle manufactured by Magna Steyr under license from Mercedes Benz in 1972.”

It’s only in 1993 that Affalterbach chose to get involved with the Geländewagen in the guise of the 500 GE 6.0 AMG. This vehicle later evolved over several years into the 2020 G63 AMG which stubbornly retains its original shape, albeit minor modern modifications, much like the vaunted Porsche 911.

The newest version of the AMG G Class Mercedes is a formidable brute whose abilities defy established laws of Physics. One would be forgiven for thinking that the whip is from an alternate universe. The 2020 G63 AMG propels its heft via a 577 horsepower handcrafted 4.0 Litre bi-turbo V8 engine so rapidly that it will put most supercars to shame. Even more so, because the car’s aerodynamics should not allow it to go that fast. You get the impression that it’s all out of sheer willpower, which is not surprising given its bullet riddled childhood. Power is transferred to the road via beefy 20-inch 10 spoke rims but 21- and 22-inch rims are available at an additional cost. The G63 retains the side exhausts which produce a range of noises from the guttural burble at low revs to the spirited growl when the beast is at full throttle. The interior gets plusher with leather from the finest cows and aluminium bits that might blind you in the sun. The chunky bits in the car do remind you that this car is also a bundu basher and not just a luxury cruiser like, say a Cadillac Escalade. Festooned with the most up-to-date MBUX system, the G63 has all the latest Merc. gadgets and it can be spec’d even more to your heart’s content.

Overally, the G63 AMG has the legendary status much like Nelson Mandela. Both entities started out in the harsh realities of war and became more sedate and more civil in the later part of their lives. Mandela can only now be accessed via old recordings and memories. However, the G63 AMG is much, much more accessible – provided you have R 3 207 480 burning a hole in your pocket. It is money well spent I assure you!

Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory Asante Afrika
Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory Asante Afrika
Mercedes Benz AMG G63 in all its Glory Asante Afrika

Continue Reading
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Parbriz Nissan Patrol Gr V Wagon Y61

    October 9, 2020 at 8:38 am

    Hi, I do think this is a great site. I stumbledupon it 😉 I’m going to return once
    again since i have book marked it. Money and freedom is the greatest way to change, may you be
    rich and continue to guide other people. https://parbrize-online.ro/lunete/lunete-chevrolet.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lifestyle

Uganda – The Pearl of Africa

Ugandan citizen and gifted photographer Kagonyera Busingye shares some of his finest pictures of Uganda – the Pearl of Africa.

Published

on

By

Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
13 / 100

Photo Exhibition by Kagonyera Busingye

What makes a pearl so precious? 

Precious Pearls are a rare find in Nature. Uganda, the Pearl of Africa, is a rare find among the 50 plus countries found on the continent. Pearls are the only gems that are formed and located within a living creature. Uganda is that Gem found in the living creature called Africa.

Uganda is like an exceptional natural pearl created by Nature with no need for polishing or cutting by man. Uganda is, as has been said, “Gifted by Nature.”

Uganda boasts of stunning landscapes, crystal clear lakes, snow-capped mountains, tropical rain forests, semi-arid savannah, primates, birds and much more.

Ugandan citizen and gifted photographer Kagonyera Busingye was kind enough to share some of his finest pictures of the Pearl of Africa.

Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Kampala by Night
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Bwebajja, Entebbe Road (Kampala)
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
River Nile
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Ssezibwa Falls (Located 35km East of Kampala in District of Mukono)
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Nyakasura Falls, (Fort Portal)
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Rubirizi District Tea Plantations
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Mount. Sabyinyo in the Virunga Mountains Vocanic Range
Uganda – The Pearl of Africa Asante Afrika
Lake Mutanda (Kisoro District)

Follow Kagonyera on Twitter and Instagram, @buskago

Continue Reading

Art

Hello Spring

Spring is about how everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing. Fashion is bold and colourful, free and beautiful. Makeup is dewy and vibrant, while the air feels alive as the first shoots of life come forth. 

Published

on

By

9 / 100

AN OPTICAL ILLUSION

By Renée Seckel

Despite a one week delay, spring is finally here and we’re ever so excited! Here to remind the world of the beauty of spring is our cover feature, Renée Seckel, a professional make-up artist who specialises in optical illusions but also does regular fashion and bridal makeup.

Anyone who has ever met Renée will tell you just what an amazing and talented artist she is, beautiful both inside and out. She is a passionate, driven, creative and goal-oriented person with the energy of a 16 year old. She is a mother and a wife, and family means everything to her. When she’s not doing makeup, Renee loves singing at her church and she absolutely loves cooking and baking too.

To say that Renée nailed her “Hello Spring” exhibition is a complete understatement. 

Tell us more about the inspiration behind “Hello Spring”.

The inspiration behind “Hello Spring” is about how everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing. Fashion is bold and colourful, free and beautiful. Makeup is dewy and vibrant, while the air feels alive as the first shoots of life come forth. 

What fascinates you about this line of work? 

I absolutely love creativity and thinking out of the box when I create different makeup looks, especially optical illusion work and special effects. 

Which two season makeup trends interest you the most?

I love the lower-liner trend and the red smoky eye. 

How do you stay abreast with the latest beauty trends?

I keep learning. We never stop learning, no matter how old you are. I make sure I go onto social media and follow other makeup artists and allow myself to draw from them too. 

“…everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing.”

Should we be on the lookout for beauty trends from you?

Most definitely! I recently launched my ‘Lashes by Renée Seckel’, so I’m excited to grow my brand.

Do you have any advice for upcoming makeup artists?

Never allow the negative opinions of people to shift your focus, keep your eye on the goal and allow that negativity to grow you. People’s opinions will always be their opinions and they are entitled to them and you cannot change that, but don’t respond to their call of negativity or allow it to alter your walk… straighten your back and keep walking!

Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Renée Seckel

Interviewed by Bubbles Mlangeni

Continue Reading

Careers

Struggles of an African University Student During the Covid-19 Pandemic

For African students in foreign universities, never has it been clearer that they were indeed in foreign lands.

Published

on

By

Struggles of an African University Student During the Covid-19 Pandemic Asante Afrika

Rorisang Moyo

It is no coincidence that systematic inequalities reared their ugly head when our tertiary institutions were put to the test. For less privileged institutions, the Covid-19 pandemic confirmed that the institutions were on crutches and the pandemic basically took those crutches away. They were left with no leg to stand on. For various African students scattered all over the world, life touched them differently. Some encountered nuisances at close proximity with some people protesting a virus. In the same world where others could do this, some were begging to return to contact learning where online learning systems were nonexistent.

The elitism in tertiary education became clearer when universities that were historically privileged/ formally white institutions managed to transition easily from hybrid learning to online learning. This was a result of years of more allocation of resources being directed towards financing more privileged race groups. This is not an incident of history in the South African context, which means that at any given point pre-pandemic, students at historically white institutions had more resources.

When it became clear that students were not going to be having any contact lectures, the more privileged universities managed to loan laptops to students who did not have access to them. For countries that had more money to spare, data was provided for students to enable them to continue with online learning. This model of assisting the student assumed that if the student did not have a gadget for online learning, once they had it, they would be in a place with good network and electricity to power those gadgets. It assumed that a student had a smart phone to be able to use the free data that they received.

For African students in foreign universities, never has it been clearer that they were indeed in foreign lands. In cases where aid was available to them, for example, data allocation, for those who had returned to their home countries, such amenities were no longer available to them. For some students who are doing post-graduate studies, more time at home meant that they managed to think about what they could do with their degrees. It was a time to work on the hobbies that they took for granted that presented financial gain. This was particularly useful in fields like content creation where experience gained from practicing one’s craft is essential. Understand that while African students go to foreign universities for better employment prospects, legislation in those places is set up in a way that jobs prioritise locals. One has to be the best of the best to justify being chosen over a local. This pandemic frustrated students in their path of achieving greatness as many on-campus opportunities were paused, for example, societies that could have been valid work experience for their résumés.

In the haste to move out of university residences where many assumed that they were just leaving for two weeks and returning, many left their academic resources. Learning became difficult when they could not access these resources. Some had to rely on online library resources which had a time limit and some did not have access to online library resources at all.

For historically privileged universities where the poorest student would be in close proximity to wealth, they returned home to be reminded of all that they did not have. Back at the university, the access gap could be bridged through the use of on-site resources. However, when they returned home, the future was bleak once again. “No student will be left behind”, it was claimed. The truth is that despite all these efforts to equalise students, it was not easy.

For countries with less to no money at all, learning stopped indefinitely. For countries like Zimbabwe where the rural areas are places where there is no internet connection whatsoever and even where there is access to the internet, one would need to sell an organ to buy data. The online learning model itself being something that was created mid-pandemic, still a work in progress. No one was prepared for it; not the students who had to absorb the information, nor the lecturers who had to learn to teach using online resources. This is a time where tertiary institutions learnt that they were ill equipped for a pandemic. Who can blame them, considering they are located in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs), where a vast majority of the population is living on less than a dollar a day? The situation was hopeless and all they could do was fold their arms and hope that people live through the pandemic to tell the tale.

“Even if it was baking banana bread for 100 days and having a sudden interest in colouring books – if you found something to do with yourself, that was a win.”

Amidst all this stress and confusion as to when the academic calendar would start and end, a lot of people’s mental health was on a downward spiral. The acknowledgement of their mental state and what they are feeling was dependent on their surrounding environments being conducive for them to express their feelings. Amidst financial stresses and the sense of uncertainty that came with not knowing what the future held, while faced with death and Zoom funerals amongst other tragedies, a lot of people felt as if their lives were falling apart. It took awareness to acknowledge how and what they were feeling. For some universities, mental health support was accessible through dialing in to 24-hour hotlines. While this was good in maintaining the functionality of the system virtually, it is sad to note that this wasn’t something that most institutions could provide.

What is the future of prioritising mental health in our institutions? Is mental health treated as urgently as other sicknesses that people can see like a bruise? It might look like institutions are failing students in this regard, but the fact on the ground is that there is still a lot of stigma surrounding the subject of mental health itself. There is a lack of understanding around why taking care of one’s mind is important.

It was not all doom though, many people had time to broaden their horizons in terms of reconnecting with old hobbies and starting new ones. Even if it was baking banana bread for 100 days and having a sudden interest in coloring books – if you found something to do with yourself, that was a win. Even if all you did was manage to get up, take a shower and look out the window, that is still fine. You do not have to change the world every day.

In this phase of our lives where nothing is in our hands, we learnt that tomorrow was not promised. We slowed down – and it might have come at a large financial and emotional cost, but we were lucky to survive it all.

Struggles of an African University Student During the Covid-19 Pandemic Asante Afrika

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Trending

Copyright © 2020. Powered by @dubecreative and @zenanitech