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Hello Spring

Spring is about how everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing. Fashion is bold and colourful, free and beautiful. Makeup is dewy and vibrant, while the air feels alive as the first shoots of life come forth. 

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9 / 100

AN OPTICAL ILLUSION

By Renée Seckel

Despite a one week delay, spring is finally here and we’re ever so excited! Here to remind the world of the beauty of spring is our cover feature, Renée Seckel, a professional make-up artist who specialises in optical illusions but also does regular fashion and bridal makeup.

Anyone who has ever met Renée will tell you just what an amazing and talented artist she is, beautiful both inside and out. She is a passionate, driven, creative and goal-oriented person with the energy of a 16 year old. She is a mother and a wife, and family means everything to her. When she’s not doing makeup, Renee loves singing at her church and she absolutely loves cooking and baking too.

To say that Renée nailed her “Hello Spring” exhibition is a complete understatement. 

Tell us more about the inspiration behind “Hello Spring”.

The inspiration behind “Hello Spring” is about how everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing. Fashion is bold and colourful, free and beautiful. Makeup is dewy and vibrant, while the air feels alive as the first shoots of life come forth. 

What fascinates you about this line of work? 

I absolutely love creativity and thinking out of the box when I create different makeup looks, especially optical illusion work and special effects. 

Which two season makeup trends interest you the most?

I love the lower-liner trend and the red smoky eye. 

How do you stay abreast with the latest beauty trends?

I keep learning. We never stop learning, no matter how old you are. I make sure I go onto social media and follow other makeup artists and allow myself to draw from them too. 

“…everything literally comes to life in Spring; there’s more energy, more colour, and the glow on everything is just amazing.”

Should we be on the lookout for beauty trends from you?

Most definitely! I recently launched my ‘Lashes by Renée Seckel’, so I’m excited to grow my brand.

Do you have any advice for upcoming makeup artists?

Never allow the negative opinions of people to shift your focus, keep your eye on the goal and allow that negativity to grow you. People’s opinions will always be their opinions and they are entitled to them and you cannot change that, but don’t respond to their call of negativity or allow it to alter your walk… straighten your back and keep walking!

Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Hello Spring Asante Afrika
Renée Seckel

Interviewed by Bubbles Mlangeni

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Art

Art of the Ordinary – Contemporary Art

How is contemporary art made? What is its cultural value? Where is it displayed?

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Art of the Ordinary - Contemporary Art Asante Afrika
Art of the Ordinary - Contemporary Art
10 / 100

by Ntuthuko Mpofu

I was not one of those people who understood the art industry and its policies, but I really wanted to involve myself in the art world; I felt there was a lot I could do there. I had no clue where to start, but I knew I had to learn. My solution to understanding or discovering the beauty of art was to walk into an art gallery or museum. I explored by visiting my local Art Gallery for the first time. It was a defining moment – my first contemporary art experience, as I was pushing myself towards boundaries.

It may sound a little counter-intuitive, but do bear with me; I was left with no choice but to do some research during my exhibition experience. I read the artist’s biography and the artist’s statement. I can’t recall the artist’s name, but I remember that he was a contemporary artist based in Moscow. What is contemporary art? Is there any economic or financial generation? How does it differ from the art of the previous generation, how can I approach it? How is contemporary art made? What is its cultural value? Where is it displayed? “In galleries of course…” after getting the clue. How does an individual begin to make it relevant in our own lives and experiences? Who then makes contemporary art? Kudzanai Chiurai, Gareth Nyandoro, Richard Mudariki, Portia Zvavahera, Rashid Jogee, Bukhosi Nyathi and Israel Israel. These are some of the artists whose work I have managed to interact with.

How does art remain contemporary? What is the relationship between art and its time? The answers to that, we shall continue to explore. Art is always in dialogue with its time and thus will always be a part of its present reality. The language around contemporary art is daunting, while the art objects themselves can be mystifying. Times are changing but is the world of art adapting to reflect the change?

What is Contemporary Art?

It is artwork produced during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Oxford defines it as “Art that is of the moment or the very recent past, in distinction to modern art, which is a more all-embracing term and can be used to cover many of the avant-garde movements of the 20th century as well as art that is contemporary...” Most scholars would define it as an art of recent years and the present day, being work including that which was produced after the modern art movement to the present day. However, modern artwork is not just art produced during a specific time frame. This style of art is difficult to define because the work is of a wide variety.

Artists of the past were often influenced by religion; today’s artists can be inspired by much more and the work often grows out of their own interests. The work they do is reflective and can reflect a diversity of narratives or perspectives. This then makes this type of art have many points of view or objectives. Contemporary Artists’ work may be influenced by their culture, globalisation, and capitalism. Common themes that might be examined include sexuality, identity, technology, globalisation, migration, urbanisation and popular trends. This makes Contemporary Art a complex examination of the present day. The advantage of this type of art is that one can empty his thoughts or state of emotions, than follow a common theme or subject. It does not limit an artist to explore ‘’orthodox’ ‘concepts like religion. The coronavirus impact will definitely be one of the subjects that will be common in most spaces.

Art of the Ordinary - Contemporary Art Asante Afrika
Title: Achtung! Men Ahead
Acrylic on Fabiano Paper
Artist: Work extract from Ivy and Alison Co.
In post-colonial Zimbabwe, Gender-Based Violence has been continuously used by men as a weapon to intimidate women and to cause physical harm and psychological damage. A lot still needs to be done by both the government and the citizens to curb GBV. 
*Achtung is a German word which means ‘Caution’.
Art of the Ordinary - Contemporary Art Asante Afrika
Title: Waiting
Acrylic on canvas
Artist: Work extract from Ivy and Alison Co.
This work seeks to demystify the perceived isolation of the boy child as an object around which toxic masculinity evolves. The sharp edges of paint and paper present a texture that drapes the figure with hardship and affliction.

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