Connect with us

Lifestyle

Uganda, The Pearl of Africa – A Photo Exhibition by Kagonyera Busingye

Ugandan citizen and gifted photographer Kagonyera Busingye shares some of his finest pictures of Uganda – the Pearl of Africa.

Published

on

What makes a pearl so precious? 

Precious Pearls are a rare find in Nature. Uganda, the Pearl of Africa, is a rare find among the 50 plus countries found on the continent. Pearls are the only gems that are formed and located within a living creature. Uganda is that Gem found in the living creature called Africa.

Uganda is like an exceptional natural pearl created by Nature with no need for polishing or cutting by man. Uganda is, as has been said, “Gifted by Nature.”

Uganda boasts of stunning landscapes, crystal clear lakes, snow-capped mountains, tropical rain forests, semi-arid savannah, primates (especially the mountain gorillas which are only found in Uganda, DRC and Rwanda in Africa), birds and much more.

Ugandan citizen and gifted photographer and traveler Kagonyera Busingye, was delighted to share with us some of his finest pictures of the Pearl of Africa.

Kampala by Night
Bwebajja, Entebbe Road (Kampala) (an upmarket neighbourhood)
River Nile
Ssezibwa Falls (Located 35km East of Kampala in District of Mukono)
Nyakasura Falls, (Fort Portal)
Rubirizi District Tea Plantations
Mount Sabyinyo in the Virunga Mountains Vocanic Range
Lake Mutanda (Kisoro District)

Follow Kagonyera on Twitter and Instagram, @buskago

Ref: https://kabiza.com/kabiza-wilderness-safaris/why-is-uganda-called-the-pearl-of-africa/

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lifestyle

Raisa Nkongndem Foletia: @AsanteAfrikaMag #EverydaySheroes

I hated how plump my lips were, how short my toes were, and how pointy my ears were because I believed those features were not aesthetically pleasing.

Published

on

By

Published Author & Poet, Raisa Nkongndem Foletia

Growing up Raisa Foletia was never short of female role models; being raised by a single mom and having four aunts made for a formidable sense of sisterhood. Her upbringing played a critical role in creating Raisa’s go getter attitude as she watched her mother flourish, despite being a single parent in a world that made things harder for her. At age 22, Raisa is a published author, poet and spoken word artist who hails from Cameroon, and has no plans on slowing down.

Raisa always knew that to get anywhere in life, one has to put in the work; as young as 13 years old she was attending workshops, conferences and seminars to brush up on her leadership and entrepreneurship skills. While her writing started as a hobby, she realised in 2018 that she wanted to tell the stories of the women in her life, stories about finding strength and finding one’s voice that are woven into her poetry because in her own words, “I have never known a weak woman”.

What is the hardest thing about being a woman?

(Yikes, ehmmmmm… hardest thing about being a woman, lol, tough.)

I think the hardest thing about being a woman is having to work extra hard to prove yourself, but still not being appreciated enough. It took so long to get the woman out of the kitchen and now she has to fight extra hard to get and maintain a seat at the table but even then, her efforts aren’t recognised. But in some twisted way, proving that we can be more in a world that constantly says we can’t, makes the victories all the more sweeter.

What aspects of being a woman did you think were important when you were younger, only to disregard them now.

(This answer came to me quite easily actually.)
The first aspect of being a woman that while growing up I thought was so important, was that looks were everything. Growing up, I didn’t watch much TV but my limited exposure to media still led me to believe that women had to look a certain way to be wanted and respected. I thought being wanted by a man was a goal.

So, I hated how plump my lips were, how short my toes were, and how pointy my ears were because I believed those features were not aesthetically pleasing. Some 6 years or so later, I realised how smart I am and how much I could get done once I put my mind to it. I realised there’s a lot more to being a woman than just looking it.

Raisa Nkongndem Foletia

What advice do you wish was given to you earlier.

Don’t have friends, lol, just kidding! Well, I think every advice that I’ve listen to has been very timely (thank God), so I’ll just share some of my favourites, if that’s ok:

* “The tongue has the power to kill or create. Create, create, create!!!!”
* “Nobody is responsible for your failure or your success.”
* “The only things that happen to you are the things you allow.”

I think those are my top three, I’m a big believer in ordering the universe and speaking things into existence, as you might have gathered, lol.

Connect with Raisa via Instagram and Twitter on her handle, @raisa_foletia.

Interviewed by Hazel Lifa

hazel@asanteafrika.net

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

The Unchecked Culture of Sexual Misconduct

We have to divorce ourselves from this mentality where we burden a victim of sexual misconduct with automated self-defence responses, because human beings’ reflexes have no manual.

Published

on

By

Image: Stop Sexual Misconduct

Rorisang Moyo

The year is any year of a woman’s life. You are fresh out of university, wet by the ears, eager to get into the big world of adulting, getting a job, and having a tax bracket. You have worked hard to complete an outstanding CV. You have submitted it. Your CV has been noticed, and you have made it to the interview stage. It is both an exciting and nerve-wracking time for you.

You are worried about what will come out of your mouth during the interview. You are worried about your outfit and how it will be perceived. The time arrives, you are called in. The interviewer is male. He tells you how beautiful you are, and how you should go out with him sometime. You freeze, because this has nothing to do with the job you are aspiring to do. You do not know how to react. This is the person who is the barrier between you, and a possible lifeline.

He proceeds to stroke your hands. Further confusion! You think about asking him to do what he is supposed to do. You think about how he will react. After all, he is the one in control. Your heart is racing. You do not know if your reaction will be perceived as offensive, and if it will make you lose the job that you have not even been offered. You flinch. Your hand moves from his now firm grasp. You know you are uncomfortable, and the room seems to be getting smaller.

You feel dirty. It is as though bugs are crawling up and down your body. You watch this stranger undressing you with his eyes. Somehow your show of being uncomfortable makes him excited and more aggressive, till he tells you in matter-of-fact terms that if you do not agree to go on a date with him, you are not getting the job.

“As long as people in key places of power are held to a different standard of accountability compared to the rest of society, history will casually repeat itself!”

Some will ask, “Why did she not just stand up and leave?” Why did she not immediately show anger and tell him a piece of her mind within the five seconds, because obviously, this behaviour is uncalled for? We have to divorce ourselves from this mentality where we burden a victim of sexual misconduct with automated self-defence responses, because human beings’ reflexes have no manual.

One would say… “at least she managed to get away. He could have done worse. It was not a big deal; can’t a man compliment a woman anymore? She should have politely declined. This is nothing new under the sun.” Men are more inclined to see things like that.

The reason why some workplaces regulate relationships between office leaders and their subordinates, is because the nature of the power dynamics may preclude a subordinate from having a genuine choice to enter into a relationship. It really is not rocket science.

Image: April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

This underhanded behaviour of sexual misconduct does not only stop at interviews. It happens even when one has gotten the job, supposedly on their own merit, only to be victimised again. Many women report being touched inappropriately, forced hugs, groping, patting, etc. We have to understand that one does not have to hold a gun to your head to make you powerless. One can just remind you of your lower social and economic position to get you to sleep with them. Sometimes they do not have to say it, they may be soft-spoken, and appear to be kind.

“In a society where sexual violence is so prevalent, there should come a time where we do not only name and shame, but we actively take steps to make sure that people do not get off lightly.”

This is not something that only happens to children where an adult gives you a sweet while convincing you that the squeezing of your breast is the thing that is not wrong and it just makes your bond stronger. The person does not have to hold out a gun to your head. The consequences of disobeying play out in your mind, and force you to comply.

The recent sexual harassment scandals surrounding Zimbabwe’s Vice President were shameful, to say the least. A few years ago, a picture of him holding a high school student’s waist in a sexual manner did not make people angry enough for me. The country was silent, and that is telling of the prevalence of sexual misconduct that is embedded in the country’s culture of being sexually inappropriate.
The story was acknowledged and not engaged. Recently, the man resigned on allegations of sexual misconduct, and then a conversation arose on social media, where the arguments about whether his inappropriate relationships with his subordinates were the subordinates’ fault. The conversation was then centred on the fact that allegations of sexual misconduct have been a historical political tool for leverage.

While that may or may not be true, it negates the victim’s experience, as it then makes the perpetrator the main character, a form of ‘victim’ in the bigger political game that is politics. The narrative that society then brings out is that, “Even if he did it, his political opponents are just using the matter to discredit him.” It is saddening that this narrative has taken light away from the hard conversations that we should be having as a society.

So what if he is a pawn in the bigger political game, how does an entire country not care that a woman has been coerced into a sexual relationship, probably in fear of her life? It is easy to look at these women as people who are lazy and have ambition to be wealthy and want to take a shortcut. That is if you take the tweets of problematic people into consideration. In a society where sexual violence is so prevalent, there should come a time where we do not only name and shame, but we actively take steps to make sure that people do not get off lightly.

Image: Stop Sexual Assault!

The year was 2007, and a young woman in South Africa accused former president of South Africa Jacob Zuma of rape. The woman was victimised thoroughly by the ANC’s women league, and eventually at Jacob Zuma’s acquittal, she was basically hounded out of the country. Again, the victim was stripped of her dignity, all to keep the narrative that Jacob Zuma, the ‘father of the nation’, could not possibly be involved in sexual misconduct. Women gathered to shame her and to make her look like a liar. The woman died at the age of 41, victimised, then forgotten. The way South African law has made powerful people untouchable and deals with them in a soft-handed manner, has set the tone of how the victims of sexual misconduct have been treated henceforth.

I have sat at tables where a fellow woman will passionately argue that there is no way a specific guy could ever be a rapist because he is popular and the world is at his disposal. This type of thinking lowers the discourse about the issues of sexual misconduct. The horror of sitting through a conversation where an alleged perpetrator was being dignified saddened me because it was a reflection of a million more people who thought the exact same way.

In 2019, the Gambian president Yahya Jammeh was accused by three women of sexual assault while in office. His party’s response to the allegations was that they were utterly disappointed to be confronted by ‘malicious allegations’ against the former president. Again, the way words are used in media, makes it seem as if some sort of smearing war was going on between the victims and the perpetrator.

When large bodies like ruling parties who essentially control the judicial system react in a way that they try to bury these stories, we know that victims of sexual misconduct will forever be in danger.
No matter how much discourse is had around these topics without the relevant actors engaging proactively, we will talk till our voices get hoarse. We will forever bemoan the state of our society. How are people supposed to help if we collectively bully victims into believing that what happened to them was a rite of passage for all beautiful women? As long as people in key places of power are held to a different standard of accountability compared to the rest of society, history will casually repeat itself!

Connect with Rori via her Blog, Email and LinkedIn:

https://rorisangmoyo2.wixsite.com/website/blog

LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/rorisang-moyo-2a8731193/

Email: rori@asanteafrika.net

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Morley Chagurika: @AsanteAfrikaMag #EverydaySheroes

I wish someone had told me I didn’t need a man to save me, marriage is a lovely thing, but it is not all I am made for.

Published

on

By

Image: Morley Chagurika

Celebrating Women’s History Month 2021

Morley Chagurika, like many born into the hard life of farming communities in Zimbabwe, had all odds against her. Being a girl put her at risk of a number of issues like sexual predators, becoming a child bride, and denial of education, which for Morley happened when she was working towards her O’ Levels.

Despite such a disadvantage, Morley today helps many young girls and boys who like her didn’t have the best of starts in life, protect and educate themselves through her work with the DREAMS Programme in her district of Mazowe in Mashonaland Central Province, Zimbabwe. Morley is one of the leading programme’s facilitators in regards to a number of young people she has managed to engage with.

Her power to take her life whatever direction she chose was taken from her, a power she today is giving back to countless youths though her hard work. The mother of seven loves her job, and feels a personal connection with the girls she helps as she has experienced most of the injustices and abuse they face first hand. A real #EverydaySheroe who now laughs in the face of her adversaries by working against them.

“I don’t always have to put myself down for the sake of other people’s pride.”

What is the best thing about being a woman?

It might sound cheesy to someone, but being a mother for me is just wow. The love I have for my kids took me by surprise, I didn’t expect it to be so intense. That aspect of motherhood also comes into play when I go out and meet vulnerable young girls; I immediately feel very protective of them and want to help them.

What advice do you wish someone had given you when you were younger?

• I wish someone had told me I didn’t need a man to save me, marriage is a lovely thing, but it is not all I am made for. I am fully capable of taking care of myself, a piece of advice that would have definitely aided, hell, even saved me from my first marriage.

• My opinion matters; whether it be an idea, comment, or passion. It matters, and I am worthy of people’s attention. I don’t always have to put myself down for the sake of other people’s pride.

What is the most interesting thing about your job?

This point brings together motherhood and my work. Being a mom to boys and knowing how harsh the world can be towards girls and women at times, plus the implications of gender roles, I try by all means to be mindful of what my husband and I teach them, what it is to be a man, and how they relate to women. A lot of the issues I meet in my work are born of social philosophies and ideas that are taught from a young age. No one is born thinking so.

Interviewed by Hazel Lifa

hazel@asanteafrika.net

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020. Powered by @dubecreative and @zenanitech