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Creative Outlet

A Woman – Poem By Ntua Edia

A woman is no piano. She’s a melody.
Lyrics formed from every unique instrument.

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Image: A Beautiful African Woman: Photography By David Marselos 2013

A woman is love.
She’s not some random melon, broken to pull out water.
A woman is a sea; salty,
but she’ll open up for you to borrow some of her to cleanse up.
She’s earth ready to suck up all your charges.
Something your physics teacher forgot to tell you.
A woman is no piano. She’s a melody.
Lyrics formed from every unique instrument.
A secret dance along the streets of Nguti.
She’s no disgrace.
Her desire to enjoy is normal, don’t kill it.
She sometimes doesn’t enjoy it for long.

A woman is no irony, no prolonged conversation.
She’s a live giver.
So, when you ask from her, wait to be given.
A woman is a sun, not some rainbow after the rain,
Painting, sculpture to blur: you try to praise.
A woman is a vacuum, empty void.
Ready or not, she’ll receive you.
A woman is a story; listen, don’t judge: hate, only listen.
Let the words that grip her throat be spat to you in bits.
A woman is peace, serenity she carries.
A woman is an ocean, open.
She’s a healer with no herbs, her hands on your ears.
No cup to be drunk from.
She’s not a moving truck.

Connect with Ntua Edia on Instagram, @edia_in_kigali.

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Creative Outlet

Her Bruised Heart – A Poem By Barbie Nyoni

…Brutally, you killed me within,
Murdered my feelings,
Made me emotionless.

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Image: A Bruised Heart

You awakened my love,
Without intentions of loving me back
Made me believe in love again
Made me walk that path again
Promised to lead the way
You led the way, but tripped

You didn’t break my heart,
But brutally, you killed me within,
Murdered my feelings,
Made me emotionless.
Above all the pain you caused me, you made me strong.

We could have fought for us.
Together we could have lived the moment
Thought we were accelerating pretty well,
Till you took a U-turn, and left me alone
In the middle of nowhere.

I almost gave up on life,
thought l would never breathe again,
But you devoured the air around me,
Refreshing my DNA, and made me strong.

I was in a coma, till you put me on life support, but l survived breathing fire.
l may be hurt, but l ain’t breaking down.
Like blown away sand, is my agony, but…
Like dust, l will rise!

Copyright @BarbieBirds 2021

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Creative Outlet

Impressionism – Lessons in Art History By Ntuthuko Mpofu

The significant art movement which had an influence on other movements was impressionism, which is deemed to have the emphasis it places on any human’s ability to perceive the world and the truth.

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Image: Impressionism

Impressionism – a 19th-century art movement characterised by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. Impressionism originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s.

wikipedia

The Significance of Impressionism

We are about to explore more than just art history or an art movement; this is an engagement about the influence of a movement. Every time people ask me questions like “Why is art expensive?”, in response, I get to say, “Do you understand the evolution or innovation of material and techniques used?” Let’s take one of your old photographs for instance, can you analyse a few things about it; What does that image mean? if you can’t answer that, it means you are in the right place where you will get to find answers to such questions. .One reader told me that at least they know about the material used in painting, but they were looking forward to learning what paintings mean.

It’s been a year since Covid-19 broke out, and the pandemic has changed it all. We may have lost our loved ones, but let’s continue to stay safe while waiting for the next trend in our lifetime. Everyone is faced with challenges; if you are doing well, it’s most likely because you were able to transform to digital platforms to conduct your business. The established, emerging artists, art galleries, blockchain-based art markets and art funds codex have been affected heavily, but I am sure like any business, they’re all trying to move to the digital space.

Image: Impressionism

The significant art movement which had an influence on other movements was impressionism, which is deemed to have the emphasis it places on any human’s ability to perceive the world and the truth. The emphasis shifted to the human act of perception itself, its mechanics and motives, and away from preconceived ideas of what was worth perceiving. People will reject you, not knowing that they’re actually opening great avenues for you; this led to the great movement which today we say played a huge role in the art scene.

Claude Monet was the founder of impressionism, but his work was refused by society because he did not follow certain rules. In the modern age, a gallery will sign an artist thinking that they will make money from him or her; that was Monet when they rejected his work. Impressionism in France then began a new chapter, on a path we are still on today. That is the best way to define its significance in this day. Impression developed in France in the nineteenth century and is based on the practice of painting outdoors and spontaneously ‘on the spot’, rather than in a studio from sketches, as defined by Tate.

Image: Impressionism

The main impressionist subjects were landscapes and scenes of everyday life. Art imparts its perspective to everyday reality. Art inspires, so the normalcy of artworks should be an inspiration to something.
Impressionism coalesced in the 1860s when a group of painters including Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley and Pierre-Auguste Renoir pursued plein air painting together.

American John Rand never joined their ranks as a preeminent artist, but as a painter living in London. Over time, other artists joined in the practice, and their exploration together moved from indoor studios to outdoor cafes, with regular get-togethers to discuss their ideas. There are a lot of artists doing this in malls in South Africa; Sanusi Olatunji is a great artist who practiced his work at the Union Buildings.

Eve Corrigan minored in Art History in College, specifically focused on Impressionism because when the French impressionists started painting in the early 1800s, they were creating a radically new style and approach to art; painting many different colors to create a unified ‘impression’ of what they saw, especially to convey how light affected the image. They typically used broad brushstrokes, painting complementary colors next to each other while still wet, to create an image of softer focus, and to emphasize the placement of colors as integral to the whole; this also focused on the importance of colors over line in the painting’s creation; the majority of such works use noticeable brushstrokes, some to the point of appearing sketch-like.

Image: Impressionism

Many artists worked in ‘plein-air’, especially at sunrises and sunsets, and used these techniques to effectively convey the immediacy of the work. This was a departure from the previously established practice of painting inside a studio. Some major impressionists (including those who rejected the term) were Paul Cézanne. I think the significance of impressionism in Western Art is that it freed art to more fully express human thought, feeling, and experience. Today, art does the same more fully, with more artists expressing their feelings. In a conversation with Vusi Mbulali on this topic, his view was that “Expressionism added to realism would be the best definition for impressionism.” Monet said, “I wish I had been born blind and suddenly was given sight.

Image: Shadow King, Vusi Mbulali

Connect with Ntuthuko:

Facebook: Ntuthuko Mpofu

Twitter: @ntuthukompofu

Instagram: iam_ntuthuko

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Careers

SA-Based Artist Thabiso Dakamela, On Exploring Emotional Themes

I have grown to develop awesome respect for single mothers and women in general, and feel they deserve some form of recognition…

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Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

“My work is classified as contemporary art, and more of impressionism than normal ordinary art. It is relevant to today’s society and addresses issues that people in my generation can resonate with, as it takes on the core of today’s living.”

Those are the words of one of South Africa’s most talented artists, Thabiso Dakamela. Based in Johannesburg, the academic-turned-artist took a moment to fill us in on his love for art.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela

Thabiso you are a renowned artist, how would you describe yourself to people who do not know you yet?

I’m a dreamer who seeks to communicate positive energy through a series and subseries of exploring emotional themes.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

When did you realise your love of art? Is there an inspiration behind your arts journey, and how did you start your journey to where you are now?

I guess I’ve been an artist since I was very young, from creating my own toys to making numerous sketches at a young age, I was being developed for where I am now as an artist. Most of my subject matter is emotional themes about women and children; this is borrowed largely from the relationship I have with my mother. Raised by her, I have grown to develop awesome respect for single mothers and women in general, and feel they deserve some form of recognition, as far as their contribution is concerned. And with the support from her and other close people in my path, I’ve had the privilege of growing to become the artist that I am today. It hasn’t been an easy journey, but it’s totally been worth every step.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art
Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

Have you worked with any influential artists and if yes, what important lessons did you learn from them?

I have been in group exhibitions with several artists whom I feel have been impactful to the industry in South Africa. The likes of Percy Maimela (Guinness World Record holder), Greatjoy Ndlovu, Vusi, Dr. Pikita Ntuli, Azael Langa, and Enoch Mlangeni to mention but a few. My experience with my fellow creatives in the industry has taught me the importance of self-improvement and growth, and thus as I look back I feel that a lot has changed and my work has evolved, and will keep doing so until I reach my fullest potential as an artist.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

Looking back, do you think making the choice to become an artist was worth it? And would you dedicate some of your time to mentor upcoming artists?

Yes, while an academic myself, I have however grown to love this part and path of my life more. It’s been worth every step being an artist. It has its own challenges, but it’s worthwhile. And in the near future, I hope to impart the knowledge that I have gained to others and to inspire some souls out there to believe in their journey and calling in whatever discipline they are in, especially art.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

Do you have any role models that helped to shape your career?

With every developing stage in my career, I think I look to different people. At the moment, Nelson Makamo has proved against all odds that the life of an artist is worth everything. I have had other artists as well that inspire me, and continue to do so, but at the moment I think we can work with a local and close name like his.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

Do you have any plans to give back to the communities? If so, where do you intend on starting?

Charity begins at home, and yeah… in the near future I do hope to start a project that would be helpful to whatever immediate community I have. Already every year there are a few paintings that I and other notable artists donate to charity and other beneficiaries.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

The arts in Africa, do you think it still needs attention? What are some of the things you wish to see improved on?

I am glad that local, fellow black people are catching up with collection and investment in art. I think we could have more of that. And yes, Africa is so rich with untapped talent. I’m glad also that there is however a notable change recently in the way the world views contemporary African art, and quite a good number of people are collecting and investing in African art, so there’s great potential, opportunities, and promises now.

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

Besides art what other business[es] are you involved in?

As a firm believer in having multiple streams of income, I do other small businesses on the side, including interior decor, branding, and soon want to start trading in the fuel industry and in property.

What advice would you give to young African teens who aspire to start a career in the art industry?

Be resilient, be passionate… express yourself, and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not good enough, because those who are meant to align with your work will eventually be in sync regardless of the amount of time it takes and the distance separating you. The world has so much to offer, be the very best at what you can be!

Image: Thabiso Dakamela Art

If you’d like to see more of Thabiso’s work or purchase some of his pieces, connect with him through his Facebook profile, @ThabisoDakamela, or through his Instagram page, @art_by_thabisodakamela.

Interviewed by Tholakele Dlamini

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